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Updated: 1 hour 28 min ago

Amsterdam Students Keen on Doing Double Degree at Wittenborg and University of Brighton in UK

Thu, 06/08/2017 - 09:35

Studying entrepreneurship at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences means students get the opportunity to earn a double degree - the Bachelor in Entrepreneurial Business Administration (EBA) – from Wittenborg as well as the University of Brighton in the UK.

The EBA combines the current IBA in Entrepreneurship & SME Management (offered in Amsterdam) with a BSc in Business from Brighton. Students can register for the double degree in Year 2 of their studies.

When students from Wittenborg Amsterdam visited the Apeldoorn location on Wednesday for a comprehensive information session, many showed a high interest in doing the double degree

The information session started with a meet-and-greet where students met not only lecturers and staff from Wittenborg, but also lecturers from Brighton who were on a 2-day visit to Apeldoorn.

Thereafter there was a general introduction by the Interim Academic Dean, Dr Regina Kecht and the Dean of Wittenborg School of Business, Dr Rauf Abdul, about the programme as well a chance for students to ask questions. There were many questions about obtaining a double degree as well as the work placement module.

Many students from Amsterdam are already running their own business ventures and wanted to know whether they can do an internship in their own companies. This is possible, but there are certain conditions to be met, Kecht said. For instance, having a good mentor and supervisor while doing your internship is imperative. This is also in the interest of academic quality insurance as students have to do a report about their work placement with input from their supervisor.

Wittenborg’s chair of the executive board, Peter Birdsall, also gave information to students about their final year of study and the requirements from both Wittenborg and Brighton, impressing on them how crucial it is focus on their intense final year studies, and avoid delays – touching on issues such as plagiarism and compulsory class attendance.

WUP 8/6/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: UK studentsUniversity of BrightonDouble DegreeWittenborg Amsterdam

Wittenborg looks back at another successful workshop event at Neso Russia

Tue, 06/06/2017 - 19:26

Wittenborg looks back at another successful workshop event at Neso Russia

After the successful workshop event last May in Brazil, this month Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences travelled to Moscow to give another powerful workshop on Presentation Skills and Sales Techniques. 

Organized together with Neso Russia, this event took place at the NESO office at the Margarita Rudomino State Library for Foreign Literature.

For a select group of motivated students, alumni and recruitment representatives, Wittenborg’s International Sales Director, Tim Birdsall, demonstrated its effective teaching methodology.

As described by Birdsall: “With the knowledge and experience from Wittenborg’s Corporate Development arm, this training has an extremely high impact for new and experienced presenters, especially when they have not practiced the theory before”.

Participants of the event reacted enthusiastically. The Neso Russia team enjoyed the workshop and called it an “inspiring evening”.

After the workshop, students learnt about the exciting opportunities that Wittenborg offers its students, giving insights into the quality and the attractiveness of public and private Dutch higher education for international students.

Birdsall has been running presentation skills, sales and leadership workshops in multi-national companies for over 20 years (clients include IBM, Bayer, BASF, and Roche Diagnostics & Henkel). Tim lives in Vienna, Austria, where Wittenborg is opening its first international campus in August 2017 and leads the Wittenborg Corporate Development arm.

WUP 06/06/2017

by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: NesoWittenborg Vienna

Fast-Track Degrees? – Will the UK push the concept to the limit, and will 2-year degrees lead to increased employability?

Wed, 05/31/2017 - 19:01

A discussion has arisen in the UK about the introduction of so-called ‘fast track’ degrees, and even Wittenborg has been asked to consider its opinion on these by colleagues at the University of Brighton. The UK government plans to allow universities to offer ‘compressed’ 2-year degrees, at higher fee rates. Much discussion surrounds the quality of teaching, and ‘stressful, teaching-only contracts’, however, the (private) University of Buckingham has been offering 2-year degrees and can show excellent employability results of its students who have followed the shorter ‘compressed degrees’.
 
Most UK university bachelor’s are 3-year degrees, which is the same as research university degrees in the Netherlands. As a university of applied sciences, with 4-year degree programmes, Wittenborg has been successfully offering ‘fast-track’, 3-year degrees since 2004, and does so in a unique combination of block-based, modular courses, allowing students to speed or slow their studies within the programme as required.
 
Wittenborg does this by scheduling the 240-credit, 4-year programme into 3 natural academic phases of 80 credits, spread across a year. The year is planned across 40 ‘contact weeks’ and 6 study weeks, which requires students to spend around 46.5 hours a week on their studies. 240 credits in three years is a tough job, but graduates who complete their degree in 3 years have worked hard, and are used to planning their studies and taking responsibility.
 
80 credits a year is the maximum allowed according to the Higher Education Act, and a study credit is equivalent to 28 study hours, whereas in the UK a study credit (CAT) is equivalent to 40 hours and 2 European Credits (which means a UK ‘European Credit’ is only equivalent to 20 study hours).
 
All in all, shorter, fast-track UK degrees, offered over 2 years, would mean that in European terms students have to study 90 EC credits a year, which if valued at 20 study hours per credit would mean students are working a normal, full-time working week throughout the year, with 5 weeks of holiday to boot.  This would also entail quicker access to jobs after graduation, and possibly a greater sense of responsibility to work hard, consistently and diligently – something employers will surely be keen to embrace when recruiting.
 
Critics argue that 2-year degrees fall short of the norms of the academic development of the majority of students (school leavers progressing to degrees) and would possibly fail to reach the so-called ‘Dublin Descriptors’ that outline the development from bachelor's to master's to doctorate levels, as described in the Bologna Process.
 
In Europe, many master's degrees are two years, as opposed to the normal one year at UK universities. In the Netherlands, most students spend 5 years in total reaching their master's qualification, with a bachelor's of 3 or 4 years, topped up with a master's of 1 or 2 years.
 
Whatever the critics say, the probability is that 2-year British degrees will happen, and UK universities and their partners that implement the shorter, fast-track degrees might find a distinctive competitive edge, especially in the ‘applied sciences’ degree sector.

WUP 31/05/2017

by James Wittenborg
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: UK studentsStudents

Wittenborg Student's Dance Academy a Hit with Dutch Women of All Ages

Mon, 05/29/2017 - 10:00

Mexican student Maru Lizarraga had been running her own dance academy for five years when she joined Wittenborg Amsterdam last year to do an IBA in Entrepreneurship & Small Business. “All that time I was running my business intuitively, but then realized I needed a solid entrepreneurial background to achieve my goals.”

Dance Academy Badra Falak in Breda specializes in belly dancing and has about 70 students ranging in age from 18 – 80. Maru moved to Holland 8 years ago and runs the academy with the help of her husband. She has been belly dancing for 14 years and has won many awards – including being crowned belly dance champion of Benelux in 2014. Last month she also graced the cover of Stee Magazine.

“Belly dancing is not part of Mexican culture, but I fell in love with it right away. It is an ancient dance form which was performed during rituals associated with fertility. For me, it is something which helps you connect with your femininity.”

I want women to celebrate and accept their bodies.

“In Holland, women are encouraged to be rational beings and it seems they strive to compete with men. In my work, I try to get women to celebrate their femininity and also make them feel more confident about their bodies. We are bombarded with images in magazines about the ‘ideal’ body. I try to get women to accept and celebrate their bodies just as they are.”

Why study at Wittenborg?

“Amsterdam is renowned for having one of the largest start-up communities in Europe. One of the main reasons I chose Wittenborg is because it has its own in-house incubator -Incubator UP- which provides a unique opportunity for students to connect with real entrepreneurs and their companies.

“Reading Wittenborg’s student profile, I completely recognised myself in it: “…students will have ambition, optimism and good general communication skills. They will be imaginative, artistic, conceptual thinkers and have good social networks”. I am a positive, perseverant and driven professional who is passionate about entrepreneurship and eager to learn.”

Before coming to the Netherlands Maru obtained a bachelor's degree in Industrial Design. “My family is very creative, but struggle with the business side of things. I wanted to strengthen that part in myself.”

*From 31 May – 4 June, Maru will be hosting the Orientalicious and Rags Flow Belly Dance Festival at Paradiso in Amsterdam in conjunction with Heartbeat of Bellydance. Those interested in attending, or in belly dance training, can email Maru on info@badra.nl.

WUP 29/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

 

Related Content: Wittenborg StudentsIBA

Chinese Delegation from Wuhan University Cements Relations with Wittenborg on Visit to Apeldoorn

Sat, 05/27/2017 - 07:23

Representatives from Wuhan Business University in China visited Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences this week for further talks on cooperation opportunities between the two institutes.

Discussions focused on a top-up study programme that allows for Bachelor students from Wuhan to come to Apeldoorn to do accelerated degrees at Wittenborg, and for Bachelor students to enter Master degree programmes. The cooperation will be in the area of business administration, smart industry, hospitality and tourism.

This follows Wittenborg CEO Maggie Feng’s recent visit to Wuhan and other institutes of higher education in China to foster relations. Wuhan is the first to return the visit.

Feng went to China in March as part of a trade mission led by the Gelderland province. She was accompanied by Michiel Scheffer, D66 member of Gelderland’s provincial executive, Apeldoorn councillor Alderman Johan Kruithof and representatives from the Full Sports Group (FSG).

The Chinese delegation from Wuhan was led by Buyue Sun, vice-president, and 4 colleagues. Feng said there was also talk of a summer course and a short exchange programme for students and scholars from the two universities. “The idea is to form a long-term relationship.”

Wuhan Business University (WBU) is an HBO-level institute with more than 10,000 students and offers degree programmes in 11 study areas, including hospitality, equestrian sports, art and management.

The delegation also met Kruithof at the Apeldoorn city hall and visited the FSG campus as well as the Dutch Royal Racecourse.

WUP 27/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: Wuhan Business University

Apeldoorn in the Top 10 of Happiest Cities

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 10:42

Apeldoorn, the city where Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences is located, is in the top 10 of the happiest places to live in the Netherlands.

This is according to the Atlas voor Gemeenten, an annual publication, which compares the 50 biggest municipalities in Holland. This year the researchers zoned in on the theme “Happiness”, looking at which municipalities have the happiest residents.

The city coming out tops was Ede – about 28km from Apeldoorn, which occupies 7th  place on the list. Both are located in the Gelderland province. People from Rotterdam are apparently the least happy. 

The good news is that, in general, 87% of Dutch people indicated that they are indeed happy. City dwellers in general seem less content (87%) than those who live in more rural parts of the country (89%), like Ede.

“Happy communities in general are those with an appealing work and living climate where many healthy and employed people work,” researchers wrote.

The unhappiest cities are characterized by a high number of those unfit for work, the unemployed, migrants and single parents. Lifestyle often also plays a role in experiencing happiness – things like having regular contact with friends and family and good health. Those who drink moderately are also apparently happier than teetotallers, or those who drink excessively!

What about age? According to the study, those under 35 years old and above 66 years are the happiest.

Source: NRC

WUP 25/5/2017
by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: ApeldoornGemeente ApeldoornStudy in ApeldoornWhat's Apeldoorn

Wittenborg Lecturer Attains PhD in Finance after 3 Years of Hard Work

Tue, 05/23/2017 - 16:33

Three years of hard work have paid off for Wittenborg lecturer, Muhammad Ashfaq, who recently completed his PhD in Finance, defending his thesis at Tübingen University in Germany (on a cooperative PhD program between Coburg University of Applied Sciences and Tübingen University).

“I have not had a weekend off for two years! Now I have to look for a new challenge,” said Ashfaq who has been teaching at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences since early 2014, and lives with his family in Germany. 

On how he managed to complete his studies while teaching at two universities in Germany as well as at Wittenborg, Ashfaq said he learned the power of self-discipline. “I committed myself to writing at least one page a day. I would prepare my research in the evening and come in to my office at 6am in the morning while everything was still quiet, and write until 10am when the students start arriving.

“Both my supervisors – Prof. Randall and Prof. Khalfaoui – were very supportive throughout the whole process. Most importantly, it would have not been possible without the enduring support of my wife and my parents. Sometimes, I saw my only child after two or three days, despite working nearby in my office, because I came home late at night and left in the early morning.”

His research topic looks at the knowledge, attitude and preferences of Muslims living in Germany towards Retail, Islamic Banking Products and Services through Empirical Analysis. 

“The most difficult part of doing a PhD for me was deciding on a topic – it took me six months because there are so many interesting topics, and you have to consider which ideas are viable, manageable and attainable in terms of data collection, etc. But in the end I was able to see it through and am happy that I achieved my goal.”

While working on his PhD, Ashfaq travelled to many countries around the world to make presentations about his work. Late last year, he contributed to and co-edited two books, one of which is published in English and German. At Wittenborg he teaches to MBA and EMBA students.

WUP 22/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

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'Debbie' - Internationalisation more than just an international classroom or study abroad.

Sun, 05/21/2017 - 23:01

Any international university, or college, must have strong support systems for its international students coming to study abroad, or local students going for a period of study or work placement in another country.

But it doesn’t just end there – international institutions often provide deep support and assistance to their international visitors, just as they are the main base for their local students going out to study or work in a foreign land.
 
International students often need in depth information and help in all sorts of areas, from housing, to filling in official forms, from opening a bank account to applying for a visa, from medical insurance to health and dental care.
 
Sometimes, but very rarely, help is required in an ultimate health care decision, as was the case of Wittenborg’s Chinese student Debbie Kuang (1979-2012).
 
Yesterday, Wittenborg’s Maggie Feng, Peter Birdsall and former business lecturer Henry Muusz, whose family helped care for her, visited Debbie’s grave at the cemetery in Epe, which they maintain.
 
5 years ago, Debbie was awarded an honorary degree. She died of cancer on May 22nd 2012, and is buried in the place of Epe, a town 10km to the north of Apeldoorn, after her parents agreed with Wittenborg's directors to have this arranged.
 
On receiving her degree at the ceremony held at the Epe Hospice on 20th May 2012, Debbie requested that the institute support students from abroad to study in the Netherlands, by setting up a fund in her name.

Since her passing, Wittenborg launched a 'Debbie Scholarship Fund', that supports OTS, Holland Scholarship and other awards. The university has awarded more than a quarter of a million euro in scholarships and study aid to international students from developing countries.
 
Wittenborg aims to launch a new variant of the 'Debbie Scholarship Fund' at its November Wittenborg 30 Gala.


Related Content: Debbie Kuang Scholarship FundKuang HuiHong – ‘Debbie’ receives honorary degree

Wittenborg a Top Choice for Student Satisfaction - Results in from NSE 2017 - the Dutch National Student Survey 2017

Thu, 05/18/2017 - 00:02

Which universities in the Netherlands are keeping their students the happiest?

The results from the 2017 National Student Survey (NSE 2017) show that student satisfaction levels at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences has not only improved across the board from 2016, but is also significantly higher than the national average. Wittenborg's unique education approach of Internationalisation in the Classroom has scored highly.

Wittenborg's results are in glaring contrast to the average situation at Dutch universities of applied sciences which has been described as “stagnant” for the first time in 4 years in a press release by the NSE. While Dutch students are most happy about their internship experience itself and the companies they work for, they’re the least happy about the career preparation they get from their institutes and the assistance during the internship.

Students scored Wittenborg’s general study programme a whopping 8.08 out of 10 – up considerably from 7.17 last year. The national average is 7.94 out of 10.

The institute got excellent marks for its internationalism (8.34) compared to the national average of 6.34 Internationalism is a new theme which was added to the survey this year. Students were asked to what extent their institute encourages them to learn about other cultures, how international the focus of programmes are and about the opportunities offered to study or do an internship abroad.

Wittenborg scores high (8.34) on the quality of its teachers - their expertise, availability, quality of feedback and guidance, professionalism and command of the English language. It was also commended by students for the small size of its classes. The lowest marks the institute got was for its internship programme , but with a 7.14, this was still way above the national average.

Another 'lower' score was Wittenborg's quality evaluation which deals with how the university uses evaluation outcomes and deals with complaints and issues (7.64). This compared to a national average score of 6.42.

Wittenborg also did well on the general skills (8.20) it transfers to students such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills, teamwork and debating. Same goes for practical skills (8.08) like analytical thinking, research methods and conducting applied research.

Nationally the National Student Survey shows that students at research universities are more satisfied than those at universities of applied sciences – with one exception: preparation for a professional career. From the survey it also seems that younger students and male students are happier than matured students and female students with their studies.

WUP 18/05/2017

by Anesca Smith

©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: NSSNSEStudent RepsQuality System

Wittenborg a Top Choice for Student Satisfaction - Results in from NSE 2017 - the Dutch National Student Survey 2017

Thu, 05/18/2017 - 00:00

Which universities in the Netherlands are keeping their students the happiest?

The results from the 2017 National Student Survey (NSE 2017) show that student satisfaction levels at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences has not only improved across the board from 2016, but is also significantly higher than the national average. Wittenborg's unique education approach of Internationalisation in the Classroom has scored highly.

Wittenborg's results are in glaring contrast to the average situation at Dutch universities of applied sciences which has been described as “stagnant” for the first time in 4 years in a press release by the NSE. While Dutch students are most happy about their internship experience itself and the companies they work for, they’re the least happy about the career preparation they get from their institutes and the assistance during the internship.

Students scored Wittenborg’s general study programme a whopping 8.08 out of 10 – up considerably from 7.17 last year. The national average is 7.94 out of 10.

The institute got excellent marks for its internationalism (8.34) compared to the national average of 6.34 Internationalism is a new theme which was added to the survey this year. Students were asked to what extent their institute encourages them to learn about other cultures, how international the focus of programmes are and about the opportunities offered to study or do an internship abroad.

Wittenborg scores high (8.34) on the quality of its teachers - their expertise, availability, quality of feedback and guidance, professionalism and command of the English language. It was also commended by students for the small size of its classes. The lowest marks the institute got was for its internship programme , but with a 7.14, this was still way above the national average.

Another 'lower' score was Wittenborg's quality evaluation which deals with how the university uses evaluation outcomes and deals with complaints and issues (7.64). This compared to a national average score of 6.42.

Wittenborg also did well on the general skills (8.20) it transfers to students such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication skills, teamwork and debating. Same goes for practical skills (8.08) like analytical thinking, research methods and conducting applied research.

Nationally the National Student Survey shows that students at research universities are more satisfied than those at universities of applied sciences – with one exception: preparation for a professional career. From the survey it also seems that younger students and male students are happier than matured students and female students with their studies.

WUP 18/05/2017

by Anesca Smith

©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: NSSNSEStudent RepsQuality System

Wittenborg Graduate Off to Italy for Masters in Food Studies

Wed, 05/17/2017 - 14:47

Australian graduate Katharine Smith wants to use the education she got at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences to help restaurants better human and environmental health in their day-to-day business.

Smith graduated from Wittenborg in February with an IBA (Bachelor) in Hospitality Management. Now she is heading to the innovative University of Gastronomic Sciences in Italy where she will do a master's degree in Gastronomy: Food of the World, Food Cultures and Mobility. She hopes to become a consultant, using the knowledge she learned from her bachelor's thesis, as well as her upcoming master's thesis, to help restaurants.

Smith, a direct-entry student, was already living in Holland and working as a payroll manager when she decided to study at Wittenborg and make a career change into hospitality with a focus on restaurants.

“I chose Wittenborg because it offers an English-taught degree with a focus on hospitality management which features subjects I was interested in, such as Business Planning, Restaurant Design and Marketing.”

Her advice to current students is to start as early as possible with their graduation assignment research. “Doing a thesis is much more work than you think!”

WUP 17/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: international studentsIBA Hospitality ManagementIBA

Wittenborg Sales Director Impressed with Brazilian Students

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 10:07

Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences made its first trip to Brazil this week where the institute’s international sales director, Tim Birdsall, talked to select groups about the quality and attractiveness of Dutch higher education for international students.

“I met some great students,” Birdsall said afterwards. They are very engaged and already showing high levels of interpersonal skills. If these are the people in charge of Brazil's future, Brazil is in good hands!”

Birdsall has been running presentation skills, sales and leadership workshops with multi-national environment for over 20 years. On Tuesday he first traveled to the country's federal capitol, Brasília, where he made a stop at the Nuffic Neso Brazil office and gave a training session on presentation skills and sales techniques and also got to meet about 20 Dutch university alumni who had all studied in Holland.

After the presentation skills workshop, he spoke about studying at Wittenborg which is one of the most international institutes of higher education in the Netherlands with almost 100 different nationalities studying at its locations in Apeldoorn and Amsterdam the past 3 years.
Tim lives in Vienna Austria, where Wittenborg is opening its first international campus in August 2017.  

After his visit to Brasília he was off to São Paulo to meet with, among other activities, high school pupils at a local high school.

WUP 15/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: international studentsinternational campusWittenborg Vienna

Neso China: Partnerships Key for Dutch Universities Wishing to Attract More Chinese Students

Thu, 05/11/2017 - 16:48

For Dutch universities of applied sciences wishing to attract Chinese students it is key to form long-term relationships with Chinese institutes of higher education.

This is the advice from Charles Hoedt, director of the Netherlands Education Support Office (Neso) in China, who recently met with Wittenborg directors Peter Birdsall and Maggie Feng in Beijing.

Hoedt was commenting on current trends in the Chinese education market, noting that forming partnerships in China was obviously not a problem for Wittenborg, who recently made agreements with no less than 5 institutes of higher education in China during a trade mission.

“In general, it is harder for universities of applied sciences (HBO) to attract Chinese students than for research universities. The recruitment market in China has changed, especially for bachelor's students, and the competition is fierce,” Hoedt said.

“The HBO-level institutions that do well in China are usually the ones with a solid long-term China strategy and/or a full-time representative in China. Institutes of higher education can build a name by initiating partnerships or exchange programmes, awarding scholarships, establishing a solid alumni strategy, and collaborating with local agents and representatives. Local presence as well as long-term relationships with Chinese counterparts are key to attracting Chinese students.

“As Neso China is responsible for the generic promotion of Dutch education, we put a lot of effort in the general HBO-level education. We explain the Dutch binary system as part of promotion activities and try to increase awareness of about the global recognition of the high quality of Dutch UAS. Additionally, we have hosted an information session in collaboration with the Dutch Embassy to pinpoint the challenges that HBO-level education faces in China.”

Nonetheless, according to Hoedt, prospects for universities of applied sciences seem to be brightening. “There is a general trend in China towards HBO-level education due to the demand for applied research and skilled workers. In practice this means that the Chinese government stimulates and funds Chinese HBO-level institutes. China wants to be the biggest global hub for international students by 2020. The funds that the government spends on the internationalization of HBO-level institutes imply numerous opportunities for knowledge exchange, teacher and student exchange programs and partnerships which can lead to more awareness about Dutch universities of applied sciences, and eventually more international students.”

WUP 11/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: NesoChinaChinese studentenchinese studentsHBOTransnational Higher Education

Wittenborg Wants International Students to Impact Economy, says its team at AACSB Conference in Vienna

Tue, 05/09/2017 - 16:47

Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences wants its international students to contribute to society by making an impact on the Dutch economy or the economy of their home country.

So says Wittenborg’s chair of the executive board, Peter Birdsall, who is currently attending the annual conference (Europe, Middle East & Africa) of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International) in Vienna with the Dean of Wittenborg School of Business, Dr Rauf Abdul and Dr Regina Kecht, WUAS' Interim Academic Dean. AACSB is a professional  US organization focused on advancing business education. About 35 countries from Europe, the Middle East and Africa are represented at the conference.

The conference officially opened on Sunday. According to Birdsall, the first sessions were about explaining to institutions why it is important to align their mission statement, strategic goals and the impact they have on society. "At Wittenborg our unique mission statement is internationalisation of higher education. It’s important that our international students make an impact on the Dutch economy or that of their home country."

According to Birdsall, Wittenborg also appreciates the AACSB’s approach to modern concepts of employability at business schools. "Traditionally there is a clear division between faculty members and support staff, however, this is changing, with a modern concept of employability emerging. At Wittenborg, for instance, there is a strong overlap of tasks and AACSB recognizes this grey area, and focuses on how staff are qualified to facilitate and manage education."

AACSB, which has a 100-year history, also unveiled a new brand identity. The organization wants to do more to meet the changing needs of society and business.

Wittenborg recently became a member of AACSB and will start with the accreditation process later this year – something that can take between 3 – 7 years. However, AACSB and the Dutch Flemish Accreditation Organisation (NVAO) have signed a collaborative agreement enabling schools in the European region to earn initial accreditation with both organizations under a single, streamlined process. For schools in the Netherlands and Flanders this means administrators will experience greater ease in preparing for accreditation review without compromising on standards.

Witttenborg's degree programmes are already accredited by NVAO as well as FIBAA, a European, internationally oriented agency for quality assurance and quality development in higher education. In explaining the decision to also seek AACSB accreditation, Birdsall said: "The AACSB is a much more global accreditation system with a specific focus on business schools." It is a move also recommended by NVAO.

The conference ends on Tuesday. It is chaired by Philip Vergauwen, the Dean of Maastricht University's School of Business and Economics.

WUP 9/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: AACSBNVAOTransnational Higher Education

Non-EU Students Allowed to form Start-Ups During Studies

Sat, 05/06/2017 - 11:35

Non-EU students and researchers in the Netherlands are now officially allowed to form their own start-ups while studying.

This is good news for all students doing a broad business degree at Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences who wish to start their own companies – especially its Amsterdam students doing an IBA (Bachelor) in Entrepreneurship & Small Business

The decision, which is valid from 1 April 2017, was published in the Government Gazette on 4 April.

“The cabinet wants to give students from outside EU the opportunity to start their own companies alongside their studies in order to stimulate the formation of innovative start-ups. However, studying should still be their main priority and the basis for granting a study permit. Hence, activities relating to self-employment should not be in lieu of study progress. The IND will be monitoring this,” the gazetted notice warns.

Currently, non-EU students can only work for a maximum of ten hours a week or, instead, work full-time during the summer months of June, July and August. The latest changes allows them to form a start-up alongside the permitted working hours.

Residence permits issued after 1 April 2017 will reflect the change in regulations. Those students whose permit was issued before 1 April will have the right to transitional arrangements, which means they are also allowed to work as entrepreneurs.

WUP 6/5/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: international studentsIBA

UK set for more higher education uncertainty

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 09:47

With various joint programmes delivered in the Netherlands with the University of Brighton, Wittenborg is essentially also an offshore campus for Brighton. Currently, the two institutes offer four UK master's, in hospitality, tourism, event management and sports business, as well as a double degree in hospitality management and a double degree in business and entrepreneurship. These are to be expanded in 2018 with the addition of degree programmes in education.

Being closely tied with a UK university, events in the UK that effect higher education policies, such as immigration and student tuition fees, are important, but maybe not as much as one would imagine.

In the UK, higher education is not an important factor in election campaigns, however the government of the day often has at least a short term impact on universities, through changes in funding systems, quality assurance regulations and important policies regarding international students.

The recent calling of a 'snap-election' by Prime Minister Theresa May, has brought with it the prospect that current proposed policy changes (the Higher Education Bill) might not be pushed through, and that university fees may be in discussion again, especially if the Labour Party were to regain control, possibly with a coalition government.

However, the current mood of the country seems to back the Conservatives of May and the planned implementation of 'Brexit', and although pollsters can no longer be relied on, what is undeniable is that there is no strong opposition.


If May were to entrench her power with a full and stronger mandate, the Brexit negotiations would possibly be 'harder'. However, signs from the Dutch government are that they, together with other close 'Anglo partners' are already preparing deals that will safeguard their business.

For Wittenborg, little change is expected before 2020, and with UK degrees being recognised around the world no threat is seen to its partnership with Brighton from this perspective. However, there are signs that a hardening of immigration controls on both sides may lead to less possibilities for student and lecturer exchange, which might effect Brighton's flexibility of delivery in the Netherlands by its own staff. Wittenborg does not see this as a great obstacle, confident that it can resource any teaching gaps that might occur.

Student mobility is already effected with the British Border Agency already being overly tough on student visas.  This could also change when the UK realises the size of income loss when 'turning away' this important source of financial and intellectual revenue.

WUP 4/5/2017

by J.P Wedgewood
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: UKUK studentsTransnational Higher Educationuk universities

Spoorstraat building open for lessons on 5 May - Liberation Day in the Netherlands!

Mon, 05/01/2017 - 21:31

On Friday, 5 May 2017, the Dutch marks Liberation Day. Many institutes of higher education will be closed for the day, including Wittenborg's Aventus Building at Laan van Menserechten 500 in Apeldoorn.

However, as many of Wittenborg's students are preparing for the coming exams in block 6, the institute's Spoorstraat Building in Apeldoorn will be open and fully functional as usual during office hours from 8am to 5pm.

(Students - if you have lectures on Friday at the Aventus Building, please check your timetable for room changes - lessons wil take place at the Spoorstraat).

Liberation Day is celebrated each year on the 5th of May to celebrate freedom and mark the end of World War II. It is preceded by Remembrance Day on 4 May to commemorate those who fought and died in World War II and wars in general.

Several activities are planned on Friday around the country including a Liberation Festival (free entry) in Apeldoorn at the Zwitsalterrein.

WUP 1/5/2017

by Anesca Smith

©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: Spoorstraat

Wittenborg pays a visit to Beijing Dongcheng Vocational University

Fri, 04/28/2017 - 01:28

Beijing Dongcheng Vocational University, based in the Dongcheng district of China's capital city is predominantly focused on adult learning and also hosts the local Community College as well as the local branch of the Beijing Open University.

With a population of over 1 million, Dongcheng district covers the eastern half of Beijing's urban core, the 'Old City' (around 40 km2).

Wittenborg University directors Peter Birdsall and Maggie Feng (CEO) were given a tour of the facilities of its main campus building, before having a discussion on possible collaboration with the institutes President, Professor Zhang Yannong, and Associate Professor Jin Yan.

The institute boasts a number of interesting practical learning facilities, especially in the area of hospitality management, where students can simulate the various functions of hotel and restaurant management, in for instance food and beverages.

The outstanding computer facilities, where network simulations could take place, and the facilities for online classrooms (made possible by real-time filming of teaching and students), were introduced by the institutes' industry partner, Mr Guo, who outlined the special relationship that Dongcheng Vocational University has with its main commercial partner 'BECU' who in turn supports the very special relationship with the Chinese internet giant Baidu. Baidu trains many of its staff at institutes like Dongcheng Vocational University, and actively supports the concept of Life Long Learning that these vocational higher education institutes engage in.

The Dongcheng team explained that each district in Beijing has a similar vocational higher education institute, and that most classes are taken in the evenings and at the weekends by a student population that is generally working during the day. Most students study part-time.

The university has no internationalisation policy at this time, however is investigating what aspects of international partnerships could best suit their student's needs, within the framework of part-time, vocational based learning, and in a life-long learning concept.

According to CEO Feng, "Wittenborg has shown interest to help them with its internationalisation development, and is looking forward to working with Beijing Dongcheng Vocational University to achieve their goals".

Links:

WUP 28/4/2017

by P.J Wedgewood

©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: ChinaBeijingNesochinese students

Wittenborg pays visit to Neso China

Wed, 04/26/2017 - 17:29

On Tuesday Wittenborg directors Peter Birdsall and Maggie Feng paid a visit to the Netherlands Education Support Office (Neso) China at its headquarters in Beijing. They met Neso director Charles Hoedt and his team to discuss the promotion of Dutch higher education in China, and specifically the special promotion of universities of applied sciences, a system of professional higher education which is almost unique to many of the germanic countries of Europe.

Wittenborg learned that Neso China works hard to promote the Netherlands as a study destination, in what is an ever increasingly competitive market for a highly knowledgeable student body looking for their studies abroad. According to Maggie Feng, "gone are the days when institutes can travel to China and expect agents to send them 'batches of students'. Chinese students are much better equipped with language skills and knowledge of their possible study destinations than ever before, and organisations like Neso in Beijing help institutes better position themselves in a difficult market."

After the meeting, Wittenborg's Chair, Peter Birdsall said 'We were very impressed by the data shown at Neso, and Charles and his team are doing a great job at promoting Dutch higher education across China. What is clear is that the market will get tougher in the future, especially with China itself providing more higher quality graduate degrees and having its own very clear internationalisation agenda.'

Wittenborg currently has around 8% of all Chinese students studying at a University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands, however many of its students are final year and post graduate degree students, entering the university from other programmes, and therefore not directly recruited in China.

The university has strong links with China, as it's CEO, Maggie Feng is from Beijing where she grew up and attended Beijing University of Technology, before coming to the Netherlands as an exchange student, in 1999.

WUP 26/4/2017

 

by J.P Wedgewood

©Wittenborg University Press

 

Related Content: chinese studentsNesoChinaBeijingShanghai Business School

Wittenborg Student Benefits from Internship Opportunities in Apeldoorn

Tue, 04/25/2017 - 17:47

With more than 28,000 businesses in the Stedendriehoek, the region where Apeldoorn is located, internship possibilities for students from Wittenborg University of Applied Sciences abound.

One of the students who recently benefitted is Edwin Tatenda Chawirah, a Wittenborg student from Zimbabwe. Edwin recently completed his work placement at BEVON Gilde, a small business consultancy in Apeldoorn where Wittenborg has been located since 2010. It offers business improvement consultancy, Training and Project management among other services. The founder is Ben Bolland.

At Bevon, Edwin worked as a marketing and communication officer, he told the audience at the presentation of his work evaluation report, including the development of a marketing plan and updating the company’s website. He was particularly proud of one of the company’s projects Seeds for Growth which supports the development of the agricultural sector in Sierra Leone. The project is aimed at improving the livelihoods of 500 farmers and their families, a total of 3,000 local people.

According to Edwin, who came to Wittenborg in 2013, he gained a lot of new skills, such as learning to prioritise, initiating projects and taking responsibility, and he even improved his Dutch! He lives in Arnhem, near Apeldoorn, and is doing an IBA in Marketing & Communication at Wittenborg.

WUP 25/4/2017

by Anesca Smith
©Wittenborg University Press

Related Content: Wittenborg StudentsInternshipApeldoorn

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